Wild Rice Pilaf with Wild Mushrooms, Roasted Chestnuts, and Dried Cranberries

published Oct 15, 2020
thanksgiving
Wild Rice Pilaf with Wild Mushrooms, Roasted Chestnuts, and Dried Cranberries

A colorful recipe for wild rice pilaf that's full of mushrooms, chestnuts, and dried fruit.

Serves4 to 6

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Credit: Mette Nielsen

Wild rice is a flavorful and remarkably satisfying food. The mushrooms add a dark, meaty flavor and texture, while the chestnuts are creamy (and high in protein).

This meatless dish will appeal to omnivore and vegetarian alike. Cooked wild rice will keep several weeks in the refrigerator and for at least a year when frozen in a plastic freezer bag.

Sean Sherman’s The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen is Kitchn’s October pick for our Cookbook Club. See how you can participate here.

Wild Rice Pilaf with Wild Mushrooms, Roasted Chestnuts, and Dried Cranberries

A colorful recipe for wild rice pilaf that's full of mushrooms, chestnuts, and dried fruit.

Serves 4 to 6

Nutritional Info

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons

    sunflower or walnut oil

  • 1 pound

    assorted fresh mushrooms, cleaned

  • 1 tablespoon

    chopped fresh sage

  • 1/2 cup

    chopped wild onion or shallots

  • 1/2 cup

    corn stock (see Recipe Notes) or vegetable stock

  • 2 cups

    cooked wild rice

  • 1/2 cup

    dried cranberries

  • 1 cup

    roasted, peeled, chopped chestnuts (see Recipe Notes)

  • 1 tablespoon

    maple syrup or to taste

  • 1/2 to 1 teaspoon

    smoked salt or to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat and add the mushrooms, sage, and onion. Cook, stirring, until the mushrooms are nicely browned and the onion is soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the stock, wild rice, and cranberries and cook until the liquid is nearly evaporated. Stir in the roasted chestnuts. Season with maple syrup and smoked salt to taste.

Recipe Notes

Corn stock: To make corn stock, save the corncobs after you’ve enjoyed boiled or roasted corn on the cob or you’ve cut the kernels for use in a recipe. Put the corncobs into a pot and cover with water by about 1 inch. Bring to a boil and partially cover. Reduce the heat and simmer until the stock tastes “corny,” about 1 hour. Discard the cobs. Store the stock in a covered container in the refrigerator or freezer.

Roasting and peeling chestnuts: Use the sharp point of a small knife to score an X on the flat side of the chestnut and place on a baking sheet. Roast in a 350°F oven until the skins begin to peel back. The length of roasting time will depend on the freshness and size of the chestnuts and range from about 10 to 25 minutes. Remove, and when cool enough to handle, peel.

From The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman with Beth Dooley (University of Minnesota Press, 2017). Photograph by Mette Nielsen. Copyright 2017 Ghost Dancer, LLC. All rights reserved. Used by permission.