Try This: Infuse Your Cold-Brewed Iced Tea

Try This: Infuse Your Cold-Brewed Iced Tea

C11cf6783abb14f910209bcad4dd00170ffab729
Megan Gordon
Jul 21, 2011

Iced tea is a summertime staple in my house, and in the past I've always relied on "sun tea" as my preferred method. Sun Tea is made by filling a jug with cold water and tea bags and using the sun's heat to steep it on a porch or other sunny outdoor space. But recently I've been relying more on cold-brewed teas that I can just throw in the refrigerator with the herbs I have on hand.

If you're not familiar with cold-brewing teas, it's a process that uses cold water and time to slowly draw out the flavors of the tea. As Harold McGee said in a recent New York Times Article, it's a slower, gentler process but many people like the more subtle, true flavors that come about when heat isn't used. While the below recipes aren't all necessarily written with cold-brew instructions, you can make them that way. Depending on how strong you like your tea, experiment with the timing. Generally, 8-12 hours will be the perfect steep time for a cold-brewed cup of tea. And use whatever herbs you have on hand; the recipes below have specific suggestions, but I'm finding it's hard to go too terribly wrong.

Try a Recipe:
Mojito Iced Tea - New York Times
Tarragon-Spiked Lady Gray Iced Tea - Epicurious
Iced Tea With Plums and Thyme - Real Simple
Ruby Red Rosemary Iced Tea - Better Homes and Gardens

Related:
Refreshing Drink for Summer: Cold-Brewed Iced Tea
Best Coffee for Hot Days: Cold-Brewed Iced Coffee
Is it Safe to Brew and Drink Sun Tea?

(Image: Flickr member House of Sims licensed under Creative Commons)

Kitchn supports our readers with carefully chosen product recommendations to improve life at home. You support us through our independently chosen links, many of which earn us a commission.
moving--truck moving--dates moving--dolly moving--house moving--cal Created with Sketch. moving--apt