Togarashi Deviled Eggs

published Sep 11, 2022
Togarashi Deviled Eggs Recipe

Thanks to extra-rich Kewpie mayonnaise and togarashi, a Japanese chili pepper-based spice blend, these deviled eggs are a cut above your average garden variety.

Makes12 deviled eggs

Prep10 minutes

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deviled eggs on a platter
Credit: Photo: Chris Simpson; Food Styling: Pearl Jones; Prop Styling: Paige Hicks

This recipe is part of Kitchn 100 — the hundred recipes you need right now. Check out all of the amazing dishes, from Kitchn and beyond, here.

In my experience, deviled eggs have always been a consistently middle-of-the-road addition to a dinner or picnic spread: Never out of place, but never the MVP of the party either. Motivated by my share of under-seasoned, one-note, rich deviled eggs, I decided to upgrade the staple dish with just a few small tweaks. And given the already short ingredient list, I found it didn’t take much to transform the humble egg into a small-but-mighty vehicle of flavor worth writing home about. 

Credit: Photo: Chris Simpson; Food Styling: Pearl Jones; Prop Styling: Paige Hicks

What Makes These Deviled Eggs So Special?

With this classic recipe as my starting point, I ditch Hellman’s mayo and paprika for Japanese Kewpie mayonnaise and togarashi (a Japanese spice blend made from chili pepper) — two simple swaps that elevate deviled eggs to punchy, umami-forward heights. The unique richness of Kewpie mayo is balanced by the nuanced heat of togarashi, with Dijon mustard and honey adding complementary notes of brine and sweetness.

Whether you use ichimi togarashi (basic, one-ingredient ground chili pepper) or nanami or shichimi togarashi (ground chili pepper mixed with a slew of additional ingredients like black sesame seeds, orange peel, ginger, and seaweed), you’ll end up with creamy, delightfully savory handheld eggs with a pleasant kick. I love how these togarashi deviled eggs look like the classic version from the outside, but upon first bite, prove to be a cut above your garden variety. There’s a depth to them you can’t quite place your finger on, which, in my opinion, is the perfect excuse to go back for seconds. 

Credit: Photo: Chris Simpson; Food Styling: Pearl Jones; Prop Styling: Paige Hicks

If You’re Going to Make Togarashi Deviled Eggs, a Few Tips

  • Garnish the eggs before serving. Don’t forget to add a dash of togarashi and a sprinkle of minced chives on top of the eggs for both flavor and an eye-catching visual touch.
  • Pipe the filling. If you’re in a pinch, you can definitely scoop the filling into the eggs with a small spoon, but taking an extra minute to pipe the filling into the whites makes for a clean, uniform look that’s sure to elicit oohs and ahhs at the table. 
  • Make them ahead. For tips on making deviled eggs in advance, check out this game plan

Togarashi Deviled Eggs Recipe

Thanks to extra-rich Kewpie mayonnaise and togarashi, a Japanese chili pepper-based spice blend, these deviled eggs are a cut above your average garden variety.

Prep time 10 minutes

Makes 12 deviled eggs

Nutritional Info

Ingredients

  • 6

    large hard-boiled eggs

  • 10

    fresh chives

  • 1/3 cup

    Kewpie mayonnaise

  • 1 teaspoon

    Dijon mustard

  • 1/2 teaspoon

    togarashi, plus more for sprinkling

  • 1/4 teaspoon

    honey

  • 1/8 teaspoon

    freshly ground black pepper, plus more as needed

  • Kosher salt

Instructions

  1. Peel and slice 6 hard-boiled large eggs in half lengthwise. Carefully pop out the yolks or scoop out with a small spoon into a medium bowl. Arrange the egg whites, cut side up, on a large plate or serving platter. Finely chop 10 fresh chives (about 1/2 teaspoon).

  2. Mash the egg yolks with a fork until very finely crumbled and no chunks remain. Add 1/3 cup Kewpie mayonnaise, 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard, 1/2 teaspoon togarashi, 1/4 teaspoon honey, 1/8 teaspoon black pepper, and a pinch of kosher salt. Mix everything together with a spoon until completely smooth and uniform. Taste and add more kosher salt or black pepper as needed.

  3. Use a small spoon to carefully spoon the filling into the egg whites, or for a more aesthetic look, fill a piping bag with the filling, cut a 1/2-inch opening at the tip, and pipe the filling into the egg whites. Garnish with more togarashi and the chives.

Recipe Notes

Storage: Leftover deviled eggs can be kept refrigerated for several days, but may not look as pretty.