Dairy Milk In Skills
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Good Question: Replacement Glass Liner for Butter Dish?
Here’s a question from reader L.:I’ve been searching for replacement glass liners for a rectangular covered silver butter dish forever, but haven’t had any luck. Do you know where I can find them?That’s a tricky question, L.! We think your best bet is Replacements.com, a repository of pretty much every china pattern and silver set known to man.
May 3, 2019
The Cheesemonger: Why Is My Cheese Orange?
Milk is white, so why is some cheese orange? What is the culprit responsible for this color change in cheese and why would some cheesemakers choose to rob their cheese of its natural tint in the first place? (It’s not as devious as it sounds.)Cheese can be colored with a coloring agent called annatto. It’s a natural food coloring that comes from the Annatto (also known as Achiote) tree, grown in the tropical regions of Central and South America.
May 3, 2019
The Cheesemonger: Why is Blue Cheese Blue?
Cheese nerds, come hither. Have you ever really thought about why blue cheese is the color that gives it its name? And what’s the key element necessary to activate that blueness?Blue cheeses are unique for many reasons, but most significantly, they stand out from the other families of cheese because of the way they ripen. While most other cheeses are bacteria-ripened, like washed-rind cheeses, blue cheeses ripen from mold activity.
May 3, 2019
The Cheesemonger: All About Manchego
It’s one of the most widely recognized names in the gourmet cheese marketplace. And for good reason. Here, all you’ve ever wanted to know about this Spanish cheese warrior, which has dominated the modern day cheese frontier for a much shorter period of time than it’s actually been around.Characterized by a mildly gamy (think lamb choppy) flavor and a hazelnutty sweetness, Manchego is everywhere.
May 3, 2019
Stinky! A Profile of Washed Rind Cheeses The Cheesemonger
They’re the stinkiest of any cheese you’ll find behind the counter. They’re the ones that make you search your refrigerator for something that’s gone bad. In this week’s Cheesemonger column, a profile on the washed rind family of cheeses: how to pick them out, some of the best even for the non-converts, and understanding the difference between a bad stink and a good one.
May 3, 2019
Tip: Use Yogurt for a Creamy Soup
Those are the ingredients for Sara Kate’s Fridge-Clearing Avocado Soup. Maybe not the most seasonal group of ingredients in the middle of February, but it exhibits a very good (and healthy) idea for making creamy, silky soup. The finished product is below… You may only think of yogurt as a garnish, something to plop on top of a soup or stew and slowly stir in as you eat. And it does make a good garnish (we’ve done that here and here).
May 3, 2019
The Fish and Cheese Debate The Cheesemonger
There’s no official legislation outlawing the presence of fish and cheese on the same plate, but for many Italians — and those of us who would wish to remain in their gastronomic good graces — there is no greater offense. To finish a fish-focused pasta with parmigiano would have many an Italian nonna rising from their graves to deliver a hefty slap on the wrist.
May 3, 2019
Cheese That Can’t Stand Alone: 10 Uses for Ricotta Salata The Cheesemonger
There are innumerable cheeses that deserve a singular spotlight, the strong, oh-so-uniquely flavored cheeses that don’t like to share the stage with others, so formidable that they’re best enjoyed on their own, without unnecessary, condimental fanfare. But what about a cheese whose merit, more than anything else, lies in its ability to complement other foods? Here, an intro to ricotta salata, the saltier, aged version of its fresher cohort.
May 3, 2019
What’s the Difference Between Soy, Rice and Almond Milk?
Soy MilkSoy milk is probably the most popular, and the most controversial, depending on how you feel about soy in general. It typically has a thicker consistency than rice or almond milks, and lacking a sweet flavor (in non-sweetened varieties) is probably your best bet for cooking in savory dishes. Soy milk is made by soaking dry soybeans and then grinding them with water.
May 3, 2019
Food Science: How Whipped Cream Whips
No matter how many times we do it, whipping cream from a liquid into a solid always seems like kitchen magic to us. Just what’s going on in that cup of cream? Let’s take a look!When you first begin whipping cream, millions of tiny air bubbles get whisked into the liquid. The cream becomes frothy and lightens. If you stopped whisking now, the bubbles would eventually work their way out and the cream would become a uniform liquid again.But if you keep whipping, something more happens.
May 3, 2019
What is Bulgarian Buttermilk?
Yesterday, we went shopping for buttermilk for a cake recipe and found two choices: low-fat or Bulgarian. Bulgarian?We tend to shy away from low-fat ingredients when baking, so we bought the Bulgarian. But then we remembered that buttermilk is, in its natural state, low-fat. (It’s the thin liquid left over after you churn butter from cream.) Maybe the Bulgarian is a manufactured “whole milk” version? Had we made a huge mistake?
May 3, 2019
Cheese Tip: Don’t Eat Cold Cheese! The Cheesemonger
It’s one of the first tenets of cheese etiquette: don’t eat cheese straight from the fridge. Ever.Cold cheese doesn’t taste like much. But how long should you leave a cheese out? And what’s the one thing not to do when bringing your cheese up to room temperature?Cheese is composed largely of fat. And since fat means flavor, the goal is to amplify it as much as possible. When fat molecules are cold, they contract.
May 2, 2019
Good Question: What Can I Do With Unsalted Butter?
Here’s an interesting question from Victoria. I love to use real butter in my baking, and when I shop I usually buy one salted butter, and one unsalted. But, as unsalted butter isn’t as common in ingredients as salted butter, I’m left with a bunch of sticks of unsalted butter cluttering up my freezer. How much salt do I need to add to make up the difference? Victoria, we are going to answer your question in a roundabout way.
May 2, 2019
Cheese: On Melting The Cheesemonger
When cooking with cheese, there’s nothing much worse than choosing the wrong cheese for the wrong application. Mozzarella’s not great as a finisher atop pasta in the same way that parmesan is, for example, because it becomes clumpy and stringy, while a harder cheese like parmesan can become a more cohesive element of the dish. Understanding why cheeses melt in different manners can help keep your fontina on your paninis and your fetas in your salads.
May 2, 2019
Have You Tried: Västerbotten Cheese? The Cheesemonger
It’s hard having a cheesemonger for a daughter. She’s tasted a lot of what’s out there, and (admittedly) can be pretty snobby when it comes to cheese. Take it from my parents, who continually try to impress and please me with new cheeses when I go for visits. (It’s they who have the love affair with Jarlsberg Light, remember that?) But just this week, they made serious progress.
May 2, 2019
Tip: Make Butter By the Pound in a Stand Mixer
We are huge fans of making butter at home. Making your own butter is so fast and so easy that we often make small batches of table butter for maximum freshness and taste. But we’ve also been making extra-big batches lately, which is easy in the KitchenAid. Here’s how (and why!) we’ve been making butter in the stand mixer.
May 2, 2019
Tip: Try Condensed Milk In Your Hot Tea
Many years ago I was invited to a friend’s house for tea. His father is Indian, his mother is French, and my friend was born in England, so their house was this great multicultural mix of traditions. As we sat down for tea, his father slid me a plate of Indian sweets called burfi, and poured me a cup of almond tea. Instead of the usual milk, the creamer contained condensed milk, which he gestured to me to try in my tea. And it was wonderful. Rich, sweet, and milky.
May 2, 2019
Have Cheese, Will Fly: What Cheeses Travel Well The Cheesemonger
I remember my years behind the cheese counter distinctly. But around the holidays, my days would blur together, with endless hours and perpetual lines of people needing cheese. One question was consistent, anxiety-ridden and almost deja vu-like in its repetitiveness: “I’m flying. I want to bring cheese. But can I?” The simple answer is yes.
May 2, 2019
The Perils and Joys: Cheese Souffl&eacute
Soufflés don’t play the middle ground very well: they’re either good or bad. Your success as creator hinges on the height of the rise (assuming it rises), the fluffiness of that rise, the doneness of the middle, and your ability to feed your guests before the inevitable collapse.With the quaint recipe for one in Judith Jones’ new book, The Pleasures of Cooking for One, you not only evade the perilous task of making a souffle for 6 or 8, you can also make it tonight.
May 2, 2019
Just Scramble: The Best Cheese for Eggs
With eggs this pretty you don’t want to futz much. Farm-fresh eggs like these need little enhancement — not much more than some butter and a warm pan, unless you’re like me, in which case the thought of eating eggs without cheese will make you very, very sad. Picking a cheese for your eggs might seem like a no-brainer: choose something with meltability that you have on hand.
May 2, 2019
Make Cheese at Home: Fresh Buttermilk Cheese
So easy. Pretty tasty. Endless variations. Never made cheese before? That could change– tonight, if you’d like– and all you need are three ingredients. And we’d bet you already have them waiting for you at home. The process from start to finish? 15 minutes tops.We’ve made fresh cheese before– paneer, queso fresco, ricotta, mozzarella.
May 2, 2019
A Cheese Worth Finding: Jura Erguel
We took a trip to one of our most trusted sources for cheese in Manhattan the other day, looking for a great cheese for beer. What we found did the trick, but it could just as easily stand all by its lonesome, without the aid of any pairing beverage. It’s now officially this cheesemonger’s new favorite cheese. And the story behind it ain’t bad, either.
May 2, 2019
All About Pecorino
What’s in a name, anyway? In this case, pecorino is a very general definition of a style of cheese, but it’s one with an incredible range of flavors.Here, a guide to some of the most popular pecorinos, and what to be wary of, too. With a better grasp of the differences among all the types, you can stop wondering about which kind to grab when you’re cooking or snacking.The word “pecorino” comes from “pecora,” meaning sheep, in Italian.
May 2, 2019
Can You, Should You Freeze Cheese? On Freezing Cheese
Some say freezing cheese is sacrilege, some think it’s only logical. On what side do you fall? And from a cheese professional’s point of view, what’s the reasoning for taking or not taking the icy plunge? I’m pretty definitive on the issue: Don’t freeze your cheese! But, as in most cheese matters, all rules are up to interpretation. So perhaps I should restate. Don’t freeze fine cheese.
May 2, 2019
Why Does My Cheese Look Wet?
Does your cheese do this? If you’re a big cheese eater, tear-like dew drops on the surface of your cheese probably look pretty familiar, especially if your cheese has been sitting out for awhile. What exactly is happening and is there some way to make your cheese behave? Cheese is made up primarily of coagulated milk solids, or curd.
May 2, 2019
This Mold’s Fur Real: Cheese Mold in Bloom
Nope, this picture isn’t out of focus, the cheese is truly as fuzzy as it looks. The French call it cat fur, or poil de chat. And for good reason, as the mold on this particular family of cheese is pretty reminiscent of the coat of your furry friend. But don’t fear: it’s a mold that belongs to one of the most coveted types of cheese, and without it, there would be many sad cheese lovers, indeed.
May 2, 2019
Another Way to Salt: Pecorino Romano
It’s stupefying sometimes how salt is so critical to making flavors pop. And if you’re a salt fiend, “critical” is probably an understatement. In essence, salt is a booster of all things delicious.But what if you could boost your food in a different kind of way by varying how your salt makes its way into your food? Like, with cheese.
May 2, 2019
Pecorino Cacio di Roma: A Find for Sheep Lovers
Last week we covered Pecorino Romano. Great for cooking, but for eating? Not so much. If you love pecorino on the table as much as in the dish, check out this week’s feature. It’s a little trickier to find, but Italian specialty stores should have it. And since it’s the main feature of one of the most classic Roman pasta recipes around, you won’t be sorry to have made an effort to seek it out.
May 2, 2019
How Much Milk Makes One Pound of Cheese?
You may be surprised. And the answer might even help justify your spending a lot on really nice cheese; more raw material goes into making cheese than you think. Here’s betting that you’ll start appreciating each morsel just a little bit more. Get the answer, plus other cow, sheep, and goat milk musings, after the jump. 1 pound of cheese requires 10 pounds (or about 5 quarts) of cow or goat milk and about 6 pounds of sheep milk.
May 2, 2019
The Best Shape? Wagon Wheel Mac n’ Cheese
The other night, I was laid up with a bad kitchen injury and a dear friend offered to make me dinner. Little did I know that she’d inspire not only a cheese column but also the future of my mac n’ cheese making.My friend’s mac n’ cheese is actually her signature dish, so her skills are already pretty solid. A key element, of course, is high-quality cheese, of which she has a range of trusted picks.
May 2, 2019
A Worthy Replacement for Parm: Sartori SarVecchio
When it comes to cooking, it’s not unusual for Parmigiano Reggiano to factor disproportionately into your arsenal of recipes. Especially now, when everything seems to be gratin-ed, casserole-ed, or pudding-ed, anything that can act as a sub is more than welcome, especially if it comes with not only a lower price tag, but also an equally amazing taste.
May 2, 2019
Overlooked, but Not Forgotten: In Praise of Fontina
I often look through my cheese drawer for cheese column inspiration. If it’s full, I’ve got a lot to draw on. But it’s often the same couple of cheeses that I’ve already written about, my absolute favorites or my personal staples.Last night, I scrounged around, and quickly overlooked a certain cheese that falls into both of those categories, convinced that I’d written about it before.
May 2, 2019
The Closest Cheese to Fudge: Gjetost
Say it: “Yay-toast.” Have you tried this cheese?It’s Norwegian, and although the name translates directly to “goat cheese,” chances are that this cheese tastes just about as far from any you’ve had before. Gjetost is as sweet as caramel, with the texture of a dense, buttery fudge. Until this week, I’d really only thought to use Gjetost as part of a dessert course.
May 2, 2019
The Uncanny Tastiness of Burrata: It’s That Good
Burrata means “buttered” in Italian. It’s that rich. What it really is, though, is fresh cheese at its best. At first glance, burrata resembles a ball of mozzarella. But upon further scrutiny, it’s clear that this round of cheese is softer, and indeed, when cut, has an interior that spills out, revealing soft, stringy curd and fresh cream. If you’re a lover of mozzarella, ricotta, or really anything that’s straight-up creamy, this cheese is so what you want.
May 2, 2019
How To Eat Cheese for Dessert: A Trio for Your Cheese Plate
Might you be close-minded to the thought of cheese for dessert? People tend to be pretty split on the matter: either they’re on board, or they’re not. For us believers, there’s nothing better than ending a meal with a hunk of cheese and a sweet accompaniment. All that could improve the scenario would be a pour of some delicious dessert wine or sherry. If you’re a skeptic, though, you may need some more convincing.
May 2, 2019
Try This: Sheep and Goat Milk Goudas
First things first: Real goudas — that is, cheeses that are made in Holland, aged for years, and that taste sweet, nutty, and complex — are worth seeking out. They’re different than those red-wax, semi-soft pucks, often of the smoked variety. I’ve had the fortune of witnessing many people taste real gouda for the first time. These are very grateful people.
May 2, 2019
What Not To Pair: Cheese Pairings to Avoid
We talk a lot about what makes a great pairing when it comes to cheese, wine, and food. And since cheese is so rarely— really, too rarely, in our opinion— enjoyed just entirely on its own, it’s especially important to know what foods will heighten your experience of the cheeses you serve. Equally vital is knowing what not to do. (Oranges and carrots, for example, are just a preview of two things that just won’t make your cheese sing.
May 2, 2019
How the Pros Taste: The Cheese Trier
How’s a cheesemaker to know when a cheese is done aging, without breaking into the entire wheel? To ripen properly — never mind evenly — cheeses need to remain whole, so it’s pretty wasteful to remove an entire test slice for the sole purpose of tasting how it’s coming along.But cheesemaking isn’t guesswork, and sometimes it’s necessary to figure out what’s going on beneath the rind. Luckily, there’s a tool that does just this.
May 2, 2019
Seek It Out: Grana Padano
I’ve been proven wrong again. By myself.For some reason, I’ve always — for years — overlooked Grana Padano. I regarded it as a pedestrian, somewhat boring cheese. And maybe it’s because I likened it to a lesser version of Parmigiano Reggiano, which is a cheese that I’ve always felt gets too much attention, anyway.I’ve been just about as wrong as a cheesemonger can be.
May 2, 2019
All You Ever Wanted to Know About Provolone
Yesterday, I looked in the dairy section of my workplace’s walk-in refrigerator, as I often do, for inspiration for this column. There sat a sad wedge of provolone, and I pulled it out, along with a small knife. Little by little, it began to disappear. (I use the passive voice here in order not to incriminate myself and my weakness for cheese — be it even the pathetic-looking leftovers.
May 2, 2019
3 Tips for Making the Cheesiest, Most Over-the-Top Mac ‘n’ Cheese of Your Life
Even though we’ve covered the topic of macaroni and cheese many, many times, the subject is somehow never overdone. (It’s just that tasty.)Two evenings ago, I came across the best I’ve had in recent memory, and it is numbered now among some of the most standout versions I’ve ever tasted. This particular incarnation had three unique elements that could make a difference in the way that you make your mac n’ cheese.
May 2, 2019
What Can I Do or Make With Manteche Cheese?
Q: I received a BelGioioso Manteche cheese as part of a gift basket. Manteche is a mild provolone cheese shaped around a block of unsalted butter while the cheese is still warm. Over time, the provolone infuses the butter and thus becomes a deliciously decadent dairy product. The product website suggests that one pair the Manteche with fruit and crackers.
May 2, 2019
A Smart, Simple Tip for Better Mac & Cheese
How would you like to give your favorite macaroni and cheese recipe a super-creamy boost? Well, there’s an easy way to make it happen. And in case you were wondering, it does not involve adding extra cheese. It’s a simple trick — maybe you’ve already tried it? Aside from the cheese, a crucial component of really good macaroni and cheese is the pasta — and it’s time to rethink how you’ve been cooking it. Instead of water, cook your pasta in milk!
May 2, 2019
All the Colors of the Rainbow: Cheese Colors Explained
We all know that cheeses can come in various shades of colors. It’s actually kind of interesting to understand where these hues come from.And what you might not realize is that knowing a bit about a cheese’s color can inform your palate, as well. Herein, a cheat sheet divulging the why’s behind those oranges, whites, blues, and yellows.I remember growing up with a preference for white cheddar.
May 2, 2019
13 Cheeses Everyone Should Know
I was recently inspired by a Serious Eats roundup of the 13 cheeses they thought everyone should know. I took a quick glance at their list and then abruptly turned away. How many overlaps would there be if I compiled my own collection of must-have cheeses, I wondered? Surprisingly, only FOUR. Thanks to my shamefully pathetic memory, I quickly forgot all of what I saw on the Serious Eats list and promptly started my own. It took all of two minutes to compile.
May 2, 2019
Help Me Use Up This Stinky Cheese!
Q: I picked up a big hunk of Délice de Bourgogne cheese from Costco intending to split it with someone, but didn’t realize how pungent it is! My friend took one taste, did a Mr. Yuck face, and said it was all mine.The cheese is a little strong to eat with just bread or crackers, so I was hoping someone out there might have ideas for recipes. I was thinking of an onion tart, but since this is a Costco buy, I’ll still have a ton left over. Any thoughts?
May 2, 2019
Weird Yet Addictive Appetizer: Cottage Cheese & Potato Chips
I was floored when I opened up the April issue of Bon Appétit and read a confession from Andrew Knowlton, the BA Foodist, about his love of one of my own guilty pleasures: cottage cheese with potato chips. It’s a funny little snack that my husband often sets out when he has friends over — and even the most skeptical are always converted.What makes it so good? As I scoop yet another chip into the tub of cottage cheese, I often ask myself that same question.
May 2, 2019
Black and Blue: My New Favorite Way to Serve Blue Cheese
The combination seems almost obvious now, but even after all these years working with cheese, I only came upon this last week. I’ve already started proselytizing about the merits of this duo, making a convert of a close friend. She served it to raving guests at her own dinner party over the weekend.When it comes to this quick and elegant way to serve blue cheese, it’s pretty easy to become a believer.Blue cheese and blackberries. It’s that simple.
May 2, 2019
What Can I Make with Bread Cheese?
Q: I just bought “bread cheese” at Whole Foods, thinking it would be like halloumi. But after doing a bit of research, I found that maybe it is not like halloumi at all. Does anyone know a great way to use this cheese? Thanks!Sent by XelaEditor: If this is the same cheese I’m thinking of, bread cheese is a Finnish style of fresh cheese. In Finland, it’s called juustoleipa.
May 2, 2019
5 Tips for Pairing Red Wine and Cheese
There’s a pretty great rule of thumb when it comes to pairing wine with cheese: stick with white wine. It’s safer because whites have significantly lower levels of tannin, and they’re often lighter in body, which complements rather than overwhelms the flavors in cheese.But what if you prefer red wine? Luckily, rules about pairing wine and cheese are meant to be broken. Following are a few tips for choosing the best red for your wedge.This week, I called in for backup.
May 2, 2019
A Nifty, Crispy Cheese Garnish: Frico
Frico. Think of it as a cross between a crouton and a cracker. In 100% cheese form. What could be bad about that?(Absolutely nothing.)Frico is an Italian thing. It’s basically a crispy wafer of cheese, or a cheese crisp. Leave it to those genius Italians to come up with something that makes everything taste better, with such little effort.But what you don’t typically see is frico as a garnish, as seen here, for mac n’ cheese.
May 2, 2019
Try This: Roast Grapes for Cheese Platters
Perhaps it’s because cheese is so often side-by-side with wine, but grapes always seem to be the most reliable fruit fare to throw on a cheese platter. Trouble is, a grape bunch isn’t the most inspired of additions to a spread of cheese. Update your grape mojo with this elegant and seriously tasty recipe for roasted grapes. It’ll take you less than 40 minutes start to finish, and the result is as equally satisfying as an accompaniment to cheese as on its own.
May 2, 2019
How Do You Slice Mozzarella Cleanly?
Q: What’s the best way to slice balls of fresh mozzarella cleanly and neatly? I’m usually able to get a few clean slices with a knife, but then the soft cheese start squishing. Any advice?Sent by JenniferEditor: Ah! A perennial problem! I usually muddle through by holding the sides of the mozzarella as I slice to try and keep everything compact.
May 2, 2019
What’s Wrong with My Homemade Yogurt?
Q: I make my own yogurt every week. Regardless of the starter culture I use, once in a while, the yogurt develops a stringy, elastic texture. Can you explain this?Sent by KlaudiaEditor: My guess is that you’re getting either wild yeast or bacteria in your yogurt as it cultures. To prevent this, make sure to heat your yogurt to around 200°F, then cool it to around 115°F before adding the culture. It also helps if you can keep the yogurt above 100°F as it cultures.
May 2, 2019
Can I Substitute Lactaid for Regular Milk in Baking?
Q: My mom accidentally brought home Lactaid whole milk instead of Lactaid 2% and so now I’m trying to find a way to use it up. Can I use Lactaid whole milk in any baking recipe that calls for whole milk or does the fact that it’s Lactaid change its composition enough that it can’t be used the same way?Sent by CarolEditor: Carol, you can use Lactaid milk for in any baking recipe that calls for milk.
May 2, 2019
Help! Why Is My Mac and Cheese Oily Instead of Creamy?
Q: I’ve been on the hunt for the perfect mac and cheese recipe and have tried 5 different recipes, but I keep running into the same problems: the cheese separates, the dish is too oily, and there is no creamy texture. Most recipes I’ve tried use a roux-based cheese sauce. Is that the issue?Is there a fail proof recipe out there?
May 2, 2019
Why Does Cheese Have Holes?
You don’t think much about it, probably because you just accept it as a fact: Some cheeses have holes. But why? Cue cheese science.Ask Miss Muffet. Cheese is made up of curds. Whey — that liquidy, non-fat, non-curd component of milk, is the other by-product of cheesemaking, drained off and dumped. The curds, in contrast — that is, the protein and fatty solids in milk — join together and turn into cheese.But how does this happen?
May 2, 2019
Whey Tasty Whey. Yes, Whey.
For the past few weeks, I’ve been making a lot of ricotta for a project at my full-time job. As a result, there’s been a lot of whey floating around. When faced with my first windfall, a coworker told me that dumping the whey is a sin, and that I should throw some on ice and drink up. And now, I’ve got a big problem.Consider this my official plea to cheesemakers: Forget about cheese. Start selling whey.I’m beginning to panic a bit.
May 2, 2019
Today Is Squeaky Cheese Day: Tillamook Shipping Curds For the First Time Ever!
Get ready for it. Today is Squeaky Cheese Day, or at least it is according to Tillamook Cheese, which celebrates its 104th birthday by offering their cheddar cheese curds for the very first time to curd enthusiasts.Typically, Tillamook only offers their curds at their factory in Oregon. 104 is a big birthday, though, and so if you get your order in on time, you, too, can partake. Apparently there’s a limited number of curds available. Hot commodity alert.
May 2, 2019
My Uncool Kitchen Tool: Dental Floss
When I used to work behind a cheese counter, I could count on a variety of cheese knives to get the cutting done: huge, double-handled cleavers, large chef knives, and slender, sharp slicers. For the most part, it’s not a problem if you don’t personally own tons of different knives; once you get smaller portions of cheese home, you can use a pretty standard knife on nearly anything.
May 2, 2019
Cheese For Lunch: 5 New Takes on a Ploughman’s Lunch
A ploughman’s lunch doesn’t have to be something that’s only done in England. Because really, shouldn’t making cheese the centerpiece of a meal be a universal concept? Think of it as a deconstructed sandwich.A ploughman’s lunch is a simple template: pair cheese with some bread, chutney, and maybe some meat or pickles or hard-boiled egg, and call it a lunch. But what about getting a little creative with it?
May 2, 2019
Fresh Robiola: Seek This Out.
Fresh goat cheese, fresh ricotta, and cream cheese. They all serve a purpose, and each has its place. There’s one cheese that I believe combines the best elements of each of these three fresh cheeses. It can sometimes be a bit elusive, but it’s so worth the hunt. It’s my go-to cheese this time of year: all at once light, tangy, and creamy, like no other cheese around.
May 2, 2019
Ideas for Using Leftover Mascarpone?
Sent by KellynEditor: Kellyn, here are a couple ideas for both sweet and savory ways to use mascarpone:→ Easy Dessert Secret Weapon: Mascarpone→ Recipe: Spaghetti with Mascarpone, Meyer Lemon, Spinach, and HazelnutsReaders, do you have any suggestions for using mascarpone cheese?
May 2, 2019
A Surprise From Carr’s: How I Fell In Love With Their Whole Wheat Cracker
This week, a continued conversation about the best kind of cracker for cheese. Since I prefer serving cheese with bread, a cracker’s got to carry a certain kind of special quality if I’m going that route. And these most certainly do. Surprisingly, though, I passed them by for years, not knowing exactly what they were all about.Would you ever think that a Carr’s brand cracker could blow your mind?
May 2, 2019
A Cheese In Honor of the New Royal Baby: Royal Addition Cheddar
I’m not sure what other country would release a special cheese solely to commemorate the birth of a new member of the royal family. But somehow, it seems appropriate for England to do just this. Perhaps it’s their strong tradition in cheesemaking. It just feels classy. And proper. And so, for a limited time, find this special edition cheddar stateside, to honor the new addition across the pond.There’s one conundrum, though. The cheese has been aged for a year.
May 2, 2019
Like Humboldt Fog Goat Cheese? Try Cypress Grove’s Purple Haze
If you’re into cheese, you’ve likely heard of — and love — Humboldt Fog. The same creamery, Northern California’s Cypress Grove, offers another great goat, in a fresher style, and peppered with some pretty tasty embellishments. Purple Haze is easy to find, super bright-tasting and creamy, and pretty much perfect for this time of year.What makes this cheese unique is the addition of lavender and wild fennel pollen. Lavender can be a polarizing flavor.
May 2, 2019
Why Some Ricotta Is Better Than Others
Is ricotta one of your favorite things ever? Do you ever devise recipes centered solely around the incorporation of ricotta? If you’ve ever faced the disappointment of an underwhelming, grainy, tasteless, version, then you might wonder why some ricotta is better — so much better — than others. There’s really nothing worse than opening up a package of ricotta and discovering a grainy — nearly sandy, sometimes! — texture beneath the lid.
May 2, 2019
Two Amazing Cheese Appetizers from Italy
I spent a bit of time in Italy last month and came away with a lot of cheese fodder. Hard to pick just one thing to highlight. Two of my favorites are easily replicable now that I’m back home, and they’re both super simple, super elegant starters. Or rather, aperitivi. The first contains just four ingredients, and would be equally welcome as a starter or a dessert: Figs, pomegranate seeds, olive oil, and plum-sized balls of fresh mozzarella.
May 2, 2019
Ideas for Grilled Sandwiches That Don’t Use Cheese?
Q: A big bowl of soup is a perfectly complete meal for me, but my boyfriend needs more with his soup. I’d like to begin serving him grilled sandwiches with his soup, but all the interesting recipes I’ve found include cheese as the star of the sandwich. And he doesn’t like cheese. Are there any other ways to make grilled sandwiches awesome without cheese?
May 2, 2019
Check ‘Em Out! Formaggio Kitchen’s Exclusive French Imports
I recently had the serious pleasure of tasting some pretty special French cheese. They’re the style of cheese with the oldest cheesemaking history in the world: mountain varieties from the French Pyrenees, made with raw sheep milk. And thanks to Formaggio Kitchen, you can taste them, too. Have you been to Formaggio Kitchen? They’re a Cambridge specialty cheese shop that’s been around for over 30 years.
May 2, 2019
Cheese For a Crowd: A Formula for Deciding How Much Cheese to Buy
Do you serve cheese for Thanksgiving? Or maybe you’re bringing it along as your contribution? How do you know just exactly how much to purchase, so you have just the right amount? Nothing worse than not enough cheese, right? (Though leftover cheese ain’t that bad.) There’s a little formula that you might not know about, which could inform your wedge-choosing this Thanksgiving day.
May 2, 2019
One More Reason Not to Buy Pre-Grated Cheese
The other week, a friend brought over some pre-grated Parmigiano-Reggiano to cook with. It was from a nice cheese shop, and you could tell that the cheese had been grated very recently. It tasted good and wasn’t dry or dusty. I was impressed with the quality, and the convenience factor was pretty high. But we didn’t use all of it. And now I have one more reason why I will never buy cheese pre-grated. It molded. And quickly, too.
May 2, 2019