Savory Miso Oat Bowls with Charred Scallions

updated May 21, 2021
Savory Miso Oat Bowls with Charred Scallions

Steel-cut oats are cooked with protein-rich red lentils and spiked with umami-rich miso paste and soy sauce, then topped with charred scallions and crunchy radishes for a filling, plant-based breakfast.

Serves4

Prep5 minutes

Cook30 minutes

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Credit: Maria Siriano

There’s a reason oatmeal is the breakfast I turn to most often: It’s wholesome, nourishing, easy to make ahead of time, and, best of all, it’s infinitely adaptable. While a sprinkle of cinnamon and drizzle of maple syrup are nice, don’t forget there’s a savory side to oats — and it’s not to be missed. Here, steel-cut oats are cooked with protein-rich red lentils and spiked with umami-rich miso paste and soy sauce, then topped with charred scallions and crunchy radishes for a plant-based breakfast you’ll want to keep on repeat.

Start with Steel-Cut Oats and Red Lentils

For these savory oats, you’ll want to skip the green or brown lentils — which hold their shape during cooking — and opt for red lentils instead. As they cook down, they’ll fall apart and melt into the oats, adding a very welcomed creaminess to your breakfast bowl.

Savory Miso Oat Bowls with Charred Scallions

Steel-cut oats are cooked with protein-rich red lentils and spiked with umami-rich miso paste and soy sauce, then topped with charred scallions and crunchy radishes for a filling, plant-based breakfast.

Prep time 5 minutes

Cook time 30 minutes

Serves 4

Nutritional Info

Ingredients

  • 4 cups

    plus 2 tablespoons water, divided

  • 3/4 cup

    steel-cut oats

  • 1/2 cup

    red lentils

  • Kosher salt

  • 1 bunch

    scallions

  • 4

    radishes

  • 4 packed cups

    baby spinach (about 4 ounces)

  • 1 tablespoon

    avocado or olive oil

  • 1 tablespoon

    soy sauce or tamari

  • 1 cup

    low-sodium vegetable broth, warmed (optional)

  • 1/4 cup

    toasted pumpkin seeds

  • 1 tablespoon

    sesame seeds, preferably black

Instructions

  1. Bring 4 cups of the water to boil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add 3/4 cup steel-cut oats and 1/2 cup red lentils, and season with a pinch of kosher salt. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pot to prevent the oats from sticking, until tender and most of the liquid is absorbed, about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare the scallions, radishes, and spinach.

  2. Trim 1 bunch scallions and cut in half crosswise and thinly slice 4 radishes. Heat the remaining 2 tablespoons water in a large skillet over medium heat until simmering. Add 4 cups baby spinach and cook, tossing occasionally until wilted, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl.

  3. Wipe the skillet clean, add 1 tablespoon avocado or olive oil, and heat over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the scallions, season with a pinch of kosher salt, and cook, tossing occasionally, until lightly charred all over, 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.

  4. When the oats and lentils are ready, remove from the heat. Add 1 tablespoon white miso paste and 1 tablespoon soy sauce, and stir well until dissolved. To serve, divide the oat and lentil mixture among 4 bowls. Top with the spinach, charred scallions, and radishes. For creamier oats, pour 1 cup warmed vegetable broth around the edges of the bowls. Garnish with 1/4 cup toasted pumpkin seeds and 1 tablespoon black sesame seeds.

Recipe Notes

Make ahead: The oat and lentil mixture can be cooked a day in advance and reheated when ready to eat. When reheating, you may want to use a splash of water or vegetable broth to loosen the mixture.

Storage: Leftovers will keep for up to 4 days in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

Reprinted with permission from Plant-Based Buddha Bowls © 2021 Quarto Publishing Group USA Inc. Text © 2021 Kelli Foster Photography: Maria Siriano. First Published in 2021 by The Harvard Common Press, an imprint of The Quarto Group