Ingredient Spotlight: Chipilín

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(Image credit: Apartment Therapy)

Chipilín is not cultivated on an agricultural scale; it’s something you might find at farmers’ markets, in home gardens, and growing in the wild. Both the leaves and the flowers are edible, though the leaves don’t develop much of a taste until cooked. We recently tried chipilín in a Oaxacan rice recipe. It was pleasantly pungent and herbaceous – not overwhelming but enough to add some depth to the dish.

Get the recipe here:

Arroz con Chepil on Seasons of My Heart

Have you ever eaten or cooked with chipilín? We want to try more recipes!

(Image: Emily Ho)

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