Garlic-Marinated White Beans with Celery and Parsley Salad

updated Jul 18, 2020
Garlic Marinated White Beans with Celery and Parsley Salad

These garlic-marinated beans are going to be your new favorite lunch. You can use canned beans, but dried beans are preferred.

Serves4 to 6

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Credit: EE Berger

I prefer cooking dried beans for this dish because the beans will absorb more of the vinaigrette flavor if they are given time to cool in the liquid. If you abhor cooking beans, use canned, but warm them up a bit and then add the vinaigrette. The beans taste best when left to sit overnight in the vinaigrette but can be eaten right away.

Garlic Marinated White Beans with Celery and Parsley Salad

These garlic-marinated beans are going to be your new favorite lunch. You can use canned beans, but dried beans are preferred.

Serves 4 to 6

Nutritional Info

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces

    white beans (chickpeas also work well), soaked in water overnight

  • 5

    confit garlic cloves

  • 1/2 cup

    olive oil

  • 1/2 cup

    sherry or red wine vinegar

  • 2 teaspoons

    salt

  • 1 tablespoon

    mustard (whole-grain or Dijon are my favorites)

  • 1 bunch

    fresh parsley (about 1 1/2 cups), coarsely chopped

  • 1 bunch

    celery (8 ounces), thinly sliced

Instructions

  1. Drain and rinse the soaked beans and boil in fresh water until tender but not falling apart, about 30 minutes.

  2. Coarsely chop the confit garlic and combine with the oil, vinegar, salt, and mustard.

  3. Drain the cooked beans and immediately dress with the vinaigrette. Combine the beans with the parsley and celery just before serving. Taste for salt, vinegar, or olive oil.

Recipe Notes

Reprinted with permission from Ruffage by Abra Berens, Chronicle Books, 2019.

Credit: Courtesy of Chronicle Books

Find the book: Ruffage: A Practical Guide to Vegetables, by Abra Berens