Would Your Kitchen Pass A Health Inspection?

The New York Times 9.28.2010

I've always considered my kitchen to be a true representation of myself. A little polished, a little rustic — and sometimes a little sloppy. I'll be the first to admit that if it's been a long day I don't do the dishes before bed, but I've never considered the kitchen too gross to not serve food to people. It's a clean ship, even if it's unkempt once or twice a week.

But would it pass a restaurant-grade health inspection?

A recent New York Times article posed this same question. They took a look at one kitchen, and even after 12 hours of cleaning and purging half-emptied bottles and jars from the refrigerator, they still only managed to get a 77% on the inspection. Some of the things on the list that became penalizations aren't always things we'd think of.

For instance, the writer owned a cat which was an instant deduction, and the hand towels used to sanitize counters weren't in a solution and were sitting exposed on the counter (like many of us would have done as well). Small things like a refrigerator that isn't to the right temperature or a meat thermometer that wasn't calibrated correctly also made the list, but the one thing that really had us scratching our heads was the sink.

Although the writer's sink was clean it wasn't a sink that hands should be washed in. Germs from the outside world (according to the health department), should always be washed in a secondary sink so you aren't spreading all those germs into the same sink where you will eventually wash lettuce or do dishes. Shocking? It was to me!

Read the full article: Would the City Shut Down Your Kitchen? at The New York Times and tell us below if you think your kitchen would pass inspection!

Related: Is Your Kitchen an A, B, or C? Take the Los Angeles County Health Grade Test (and Get a Grade Magnet)

(Image: Flickr member HidingInABunker licensed for use by Creative Commons

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Sarah Trover has lived all across the Midwest and currently calls the hot dog-laden city of Chicago home. She rides scooters and seeks out kitchens that make the best pie.