Twitter Is Revolting Against This Strange Coffee Hack

Twitter Is Revolting Against This Strange Coffee Hack

B92b409f053c246749abfb00f4b08500a88f7875?auto=compress&w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Susmita Baral
Aug 22, 2017
(Image credit: David Crockett/Shutterstock)

Word to the wise: Think twice before airing your dirty food confessions on social media. Specifically, keep your off-beat food pairings off Twitter if you don't want to provoke the wrath of food traditionalists.

Case in point? Just ask Philadelphia-based sports writer Jim Salisbury, who confessed on the micro-blogging platform that he added mayo to his coffee. His supposed crime was that he admitted it was "not half bad." His tweet was not unsolicited, as he was responding to a tweet asking if boxed mac and cheese can substitute cottage cheese for milk. (The answer is a hard no, in case you're wondering.)

Salisbury was likely encouraging the original tweeter to experiment, but he ended up receiving the disgust and fury of Twitter users who couldn't fathom the thought. It should come as no surprise that the responses were passionate and dramatic.

The responses are not too far out, considering how the Twitter world responded to other similar food-related incidents before this. Like the "peeps on pizza" outrage and the dipping pizza in milk uproar. Or when Icelandic president Gudni Thorlacius Jóhannesson said he "firmly opposed" pineapple as a pizza topping and would be opening to banning the concept — a joke he later had to officially backtrack on.

In this particular case, the question of whether mayo makes coffee better does need to be asked. The jury is still out — although the Twitter jury appears to be nixing the notion — but personal tastes are exactly that: personal. Live and let eat, people.

Created with Sketch.