Under the Radar: Japanese Slow-Brewed Coffee

The New York Times

Like most people, when I think of good coffee locales I think of Italy, Turkey, and maybe Hawaii or South America. But Japan? Their unique brewing method is slowly spreading among coffee enthusiasts and I never even knew. Do you know about Japanese-style coffee?

I am a recovering coffee snob. It was when I started turning down friends for coffee dates unless we went to a few choice coffee boutiques that I realized I had a problem. These days I still enjoy a good cup of freshly roasted, hot French press coffee but I don't go out of my way to get it. However, I still think I know a thing or two about coffee culture. This weekend the New York Times proved me wrong. Japanese coffee? Is that even a thing? I found myself asking. Apparently, yes.

Oliver Strand was slow to learn of this phenomenon as well. As he points out, Japan imports an incredible amount of coffee (more than all of France) and has a long-established coffee culture. The center of which is a slow method of brewing the coffee through an exceptionally narrow filter. The key is the specially designed kettles and filter cones, which allow water to drip through one or two drips at a time. This results in brewing coffee one cup at a time and it is said to produce a flavorful brew in which the characteristics of the coffee beans can bloom and taste more distinctive than in traditional brewing styles. And, although trying this requires some specific equipment, it is relatively inexpensive, especially compared with the cost of trying, say, Italian-style espresso.

Have you tried Japanese style slow brewed coffee?

Read More: Coffee’s Slow Dance by Oliver Strand in The New York Times

Related: What Is the Best Way To: Make Coffee at Home?

Image: Kenji Aoki for The New York Times