Tip: How to Use Chive Blossoms in Salads and Other Dishes

Tip: How to Use Chive Blossoms in Salads and Other Dishes

A4113f7cc8c2fc3cc96eb640f4534c625dde976e?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Faith Durand
May 23, 2008

We have been admiring the beautiful chive blossoms on our rapidly growing plants, but we knew we needed to pick them off - otherwise they'll go to seed and stop growing. We pulled off a few to go with the egg and arugula tartine we just made, but were at a loss as to how to eat them.

A chive blossom is rather big and fluffy; as much as we'd like to put a few in our next salad, they'd make too much of a mouthful.

The answer is quite simple, though; pick apart the flower puffs. They come apart easily into garlicky, lightly onion scented flowerets that are delicious scattered on a salad or tartine like this.

Try adding a head or two into scrambled eggs for some pretty color, or tossing them in a big pasta salad of with hardboiled eggs, sour cream, and capers. Or mash into some goat cheese with a bit of honey for a twist on this appetizer recipe.

Related: Garden Spotlight: Chives

Created with Sketch.