The Best Way to Pack Any Booze in Your Suitcase

The Best Way to Pack Any Booze in Your Suitcase

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Martha Bernabe
Apr 10, 2017
(Image credit: Tara Donne)

Between being a prop stylist and bar owner, I naturally am a collector of antiques and booze. I have a serious addiction to shopping when I travel. And, since I have been a prop styling for over 10 years, I have a lot of experience packing and unpacking!

Over the years, I have mastered the art of properly packing my finds into a suitcase so that everything comes back intact. Here's the best way to pack any booze in your suitcase.

1. Bubble wrap and empty space are essential.

I always start by bringing a few strips of bubble wrap and leaving a lot of empty space in my suitcase. This manifests the treasure!

If you don't pack bubble wrap, however, that is fine, as it's easy to find shops that sell it. (Foam wrap will also work and this is what I used on a recent trip to Louisville.)

2. Start with a soft layer of clothes.

When you are ready to pack, gather your clothes and begin with a soft layer for the bottom of the suitcase.

(Image credit: Tara Donne)

3. Roll your booze in bubble wrap ... and then again.

So, let's say you are packing up a delicious bottle of barrel-aged bourbon you picked up in Louisville (just for example). You want to roll up the bottle in a strip of bubble wrap and then roll it up again. I usually use a pair of jeans folded lengthwise, but you could use a shirt, sweater, or really any item of clothing.

Two bottles of bourbon are safely double-bundled!
(Image credit: Tara Donne)

4. Nestle your bundle carefully.

Now you're ready to nestle your bundle between clothes. It's best if they are rolled up similarly to help the bottle stay put. You don't want it to move around during transport — that's what will cause it to break!

If you have other goodies (homemade chocolate, antique teacups), pack them up in the same way, placing harder, flatter items on top. Books and records, for example, provide a hard barrier between the fragile and the outside world.

(Image credit: Tara Donne)

5. Finish with a soft layer of clothes.

To finish, I layer a jacket or sweater on top and, voila! You're ready to zip up your bag and head to the airport.

Do you love to shop when you travel? What are your best tips for getting your finds home in one piece?

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