OXO Good Grips Locking Tongs

Product Review

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Product: OXO Good Grips Locking Tongs with Silicone Heads
Price: $13.99
Overall Impression: Why didn't I get these sooner? They're so useful and the folding feature is great.

You would think that someone who makes her living eating, cooking and writing about food would have all the equipment, especially the stuff that's inexpensive and makes basic tasks a lot easier. But I'm not like that. It took me fifteen years to commit to measuring spoons that didn't annoy me on a daily basis. Is it any surprise that it took me years to buy a tool I use almost every day?

The Review

Characteristics and Specs: OXO's line of Good Grips utensils is a pleasure to use. The name doesn't lie. They're easy to grip. The silicone heads of these tongs are heat resistant to 600° and won't scratch your pans.
Favorite details: The tongs are easy to handle and, thanks to the wide heads, they really hold on to food.
Potential problems: Our dog is mad, because I don't drop as much food. After a few months of use, they don't close quite as tightly as they did.
Splurge-worthy? Absolutely. At $13.99, they cost a little more than average tongs, but they're sturdy and easy to use.
Good for small kitchens? Yes.The folding feature makes them great for small storage spaces.

My favorite use for the tongs is cooking greens. I make sautéed greens every few days. They don't have to be specific greens; kale, collards, chard and others are all just fine. I like to have a container of them in the fridge to toss into breakfast quesadillas, salads, pasta dishes, omelets or any other dish I can sneak them into.

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I finally figured out the easiest way to slice tough greens, but I was still making a mess. A large batch is the way to go if you want them to last for a few days. They cook down fairly quickly, but they start big. Stirring them with a spoon, making sure each strip has equal access to the hottest part of the pan, leads to a lot of greens on the stove top and on the floor.

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The dog, who watches the floor like a hawk while I cook, hoping for one tiny little scrap of bacon, gives me a look when a piece of half-cooked chard hits the floor. This look of disdain is so withering, it can ruin my day. "Really?" he says with his eyes. "I sat here patiently for ten minutes of my busy, busy life for a piece of grass? Please." I can't take it. Thanks to the OXO tongs, I no longer get the look, because I don't drop anything, so he quit waiting at my feet.

Not just for greens, I use the OXO tongs to take seafood out of a steamer, corn on the cob out of boiling water, or bacon from the pan. They're also perfect for turning fried foods with minimal splatter. I've started reaching for them when I want to fold ingredients into pasta. Because they are safe to use at a high temperature, they can be used for almost any task.

True to the Good Grips name, these tongs are easy to hold. They never slip, even when I'm working over steam or my hands are a little wet. You know that instant when you realize you've lost control of the steamed crab? And you know it's going to hit the floor, and that its shell will crack, and crab juice will end up everywhere? Then you have to drop everything to make sure the dog doesn't get to it before you get to him. I never have to experience that moment again. Hooray!

My OXO Good Grip tongs are perfect. The locking mechanism makes them easy to store, so I don't toss them, as I have other, inferior tongs in the past, when they clutter my utensil drawer, springing open and jamming the drawer. They have many excellent uses, as all of you cooks know. So why did it take me so long to get them?

Find It! OXO Good Grips Locking Tongs, $12.99 at OXO

Apartment Therapy Media makes every effort to test and review products fairly and transparently. The views expressed in this review are the personal views of the reviewer and this particular product review was not sponsored or paid for in any way by the manufacturer or an agent working on their behalf. The tongs were purchased by the author at Mary and Martha's in Columbia, South Carolina.

(Image credits: Anne Wolfe Postic)

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