No, Cockroach Milk Will Not Be the Next Trendy Superfood

No, Cockroach Milk Will Not Be the Next Trendy Superfood

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Ariel Knutson
Jul 26, 2016
(Image credit: NaturalBox/Shutterstock)

The last couple days there have been whispers around the internet about cockroach milk being the next superfood.So, is it time to make room somewhere between kale and blueberries at the grocery store? Hold that thought for just a second.

Scientists are claiming that the Pacific beetle cockroach, or the Diploptera punctata, is able to give birth to live baby cockroaches instead of just eggs. A team of researchers discovered that the mother's "milk" that the cockroach secretes is a wonderful source of nutrients. Apparently this "milk" has every essential amino acid and, according to SBS, "a single milk protein crystal from the cockroach's stomach is estimated to contain more than three times the amount of energy found in an equivalent amount of dairy milk."

That's wonderful and all for the baby cockroaches, but there is no possible way that humans in this current age would willingly drink this stuff. Maybe a couple scientists will do this for research, or maybe it will be consumed on a dare, but the idea of this "milk" actually becoming a trendy beverage or superfood is just not going to happen anytime soon. I mean, have you seen one of those things roaming around your apartment? I think I'd rather only eat vegetables for the rest of my life to get all those extra nutrients than have to swallow a thimble of cockroach juice.

Thanks, anyway!

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