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Q: I have quickly come to rely on Kitchn recipes for their consistently good results. So I'm curious to know your thoughts on low-carb pizzas with a crust made primarily from cauliflower.

The recipe I recently made called for putting the cauliflower through the food processor and then making it into a "crust" by cooking it, squeezing out the excess water, and combining it with Parmesan, egg, and herbs. I was intrigued, as I love cauliflower and have been trying to lower my carb intake. I've also heard and seen many positive reviews of this type of thing.

I'm a pretty good home cook with years of experience, but my results were awful.

I was wondering if you've done such a recipe before and if so, what were your thoughts? I'm open to the idea that I just made a mistake with the recipe, but it was fairly simple and straightforward. If you've had success, I'd be interested!

Sent by Shannon

Editor: I feel like we have the potential to open up a can of worms here, Shannon, but I'm with you. I've tried my luck at cauliflower pizza crust a few times, and each time it turned out less-than-stellar results. And then I realized the problem wasn't the recipe — it was me. Cauliflower pizza crust will never come close to a true pizza crust. The expectation that it might remotely hold a candle to a crispy, thin crust was ludicrous on my part, but what can I say? I was holding out that this magical cruciferous veggie was going to surprise me, because sometimes it really does.

If you're in the business of lowering your carbs, cauliflower is still your friend. Emma has whipped up a truly delicious rendition of fried cauliflower rice that is one of the best applications of cauliflower rice I've come across. Plus, you can freeze it. Cauliflower also makes a mean purée if you want to nix the potatoes every now and then.

But pizza crust? Hard pass.

Kitchn readers, I'm curious. What are your thoughts on cauliflower pizza crust?

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