Jell-O and Mushrooms: The Strangest State Foods

Jell-O and Mushrooms: The Strangest State Foods

A4aed3a791a97550124304e1c8d2d0ac8286a154?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Stephanie Barlow
Jul 11, 2011

Inspired by New York's recent announcement claiming corn as the state vegetable when it's actually a grain, The Daily Meal reports on the strangest state foods. The realm of state foods stretches far beyond fruits and vegetables. Read on to find out which state claims Jell-O as their state snack!

Did you even know there was such a title as state snack? Utah claimed Jell-O, fitting because Salt Lake City has the highest per capita consumption of Jell-o in the world. Similarly, Nebraska's state soft drink is one of the world's most recognizable: Kool-Aid. The iconic drink mix was invented in Nebraska in the 1920s.

In 1984, Minnesota became the first state to declare a state mushroom. They chose morels, which are native to the state. Oregon followed in 1999, declaring the Pacific golden chanterelle as their state mushroom.

At the least, this list provides a smart travel guide when looking for the best foods by state. However, we imagine that Jell-O tastes the same in any state.

Do you agree with your state's food designations?

Read more: Most Bizarre State Foods at The Daily Meal

Related: Crab Cakes to Mud Pie: State-by-Food Tote Bag

(Images: Flickr user stevendepolo licensed for use under Creative Commons)

Created with Sketch.