It's True! Yuengling Beer Is Coming To A State Near You

America's oldest beer maker, D.G. Yuengling & Son Inc., announced plans to expand this week. Are you familiar with this sought-after beer?Remember the first beer you learned to order in a bar? You know, your go-to choice when you were too young to know much about beer except that you were happy to get it? Yuengling (pronounced ying-ling) was mine. It sounded a lot cooler than Bud or Miller and tasted better, too. In and around Syracuse, NY, while I was at college, this strategy worked great. However, when I tried to place my standard order at my hometown bar in Michigan, I was in for a surprise. No one had heard of it!

Currently, Yuengling is only offered in the following states: Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware, Maryland, Washington D.C., Virginia, West Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, and Alabama. Limited distribution is one of the factors that has kept this 181-year-old brewer strong against larger American distributors, according to this week's Wall Street Journal profile. Based in Pennsylvania, Yeungling has announced plans to purchase a former Coors brewery in Memphis, TN, which would expand distribution into previously uncharted territory. The company now has two breweries, one located in Pottsville, PA and another in Tampa, FL.

Yeungling is best known for its traditional lager and black and tan beers. Like many other beer makers, they are also pushing a new light beer with reduced calories. Although I'm spoiled to now live in New York and have Yuengling at my disposal, I'd like them to expand to Michigan so I can order it when I visit as well. I also hope they expand distribution to Ohio, if only to benefit the guy so passionate about the idea that he created a website called BringYuenglingToOhio.com. Make it happen, Yeungling!

Are you looking forward to the Yeungling expansion?

Read More: Yuengling Beer Thinks Big, Moves Methodically at The Wall Street Journal

Related: Quick and Dirty Guide to American Beer Styles

(Image: Flickr User merfam licensed for use under Creative Commons)

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