This Might Be the Prettiest Way to Recycle

This Might Be the Prettiest Way to Recycle

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Lisa Freedman
Apr 10, 2017
(Image credit: Aleksandra Suzi/Shutterstock)

In my last apartment, my husband used to hang a paper grocery bag on the handle of our front door, which was at least in our kitchen, and he'd call that our recycling center. It would only last a few hours before I'd move it to small cubby in the corner of our kitchen. I hated his system because it was unsightly to look at and he hated mine because it was too hard to put empty bottles into. The point: Recycling in a small apartment is hard. But it's obviously worth it and something we absolutely do!

We moved recently and our new place came with a pull-out drawer with a trashcan and recycling bin (fancy, I know!), so the issue has resolved itself. But I just found something that makes me want to rethink even our new (totally successful) system.

Say hello to the RE.BIN. (It's that white shopping bag above that's holding that brown grocery bag.) RE.BIN is made in Vermont from recycled polypropylene, a #5 plastic that can be recycled when (if) you're done with it. It's designed to be sleek and stylish enough to be left out in plain view yet compact enough to fit inside standard-size cabinets.

You put the paper grocery bag inside the bin (or you can totally skip this step) and it hides your recycling. It's also rigid, which means it won't fall over if you put things in unevenly. Then, when it's time to recycle, you just pull the paper bag out (or dump the contents into the can on the curb). It's not really rocket science, but it sure is pretty.

And it also doubles as a (pricey) gift bag, a magazine holder, or a general storage basket. Available in white or black, I honestly think either one would go in my kitchen. Sure, it's not cheap, but if you asked me a few months ago, I would have paid any amount of money to get my husband to stop hanging bags from our door handle!

Buy: Quartz or Onyx, $48 at RE.BIN

What do you think? Would you use this for your recycling?

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