Interweb Cookery: Working Class Foodies on Hungry Nation

A new online food network called Hungry Nation launched this week. So far, they only have two 'shows' — Working Class Foodies and VendrTV, with a third, 12 Minute Cocktail, due out soon. But already there are 30 episodes in the queue, so there's plenty of coffee-break-at-your-desk viewing in store. Read on for my review.

I worked really hard at it and got over my prejudice about the word "foodie", then clicked on the Tortilla Espanola episode from Working Class Foodies, a brother and sister team that cooks up a dish for two for around $10. Max and Rebecca Lando use fresh, farmers' market purchased food, cooked in Rebecca's NYC kitchen. They seem to care about where their food comes from and try to shop locally.

I ended up watching all five episodes that are currently available (about 5 minutes each) in one sitting. New episodes of Working Class Foodies are released on Mondays.

Pros

  • They really cook, so there's the not-so perfect moments, which I appreciate.

  • They give us the entire recipe.

  • They take us with them to the Greenmarket.

  • Humphrey the dog is very, very cute.

  • Cons

  • Annoying commercials! But cooking videos don't grow on trees, so I'm (just barely) willing to put up with them.

  • VendrTV stars Daniel Delaney and is released on Wednesdays. He travels the world tasting the offerings of food trucks and carts. I couldn't make it through too many shows due to an overuse of that annoying swaying camera technique. Makes me queasy. And, I'm not so interested in watching people eat food, I want to see them actually cooking. But that's just me.

    You can 'like' an episode, read the blog, comment and even upload your own food/cooking video on Hungry Nation. It looks like they will continue to add shows, so be sure to check frequently, or sign up for email updates.

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    Dana Velden is a freelance food writer. She lives, eats, plays, and gets lost in Oakland, California where she is in the throes of raising her first tomato plant.