Healthy Eating: What Should You Do With Goji Berries?

We have a family member who is obsessed with goji berries — for good reason, we suppose.

They are the current darlings of the superfood world for being much higher in antioxidants than pomegranates and having cancer-fighting qualities. Of course, we wonder how it took us so long to discover something that the Chinese have been eating forever...

We've tried goji berry juice (a gift from said family member) but not the dried berries, which are said to taste a bit like cranberries but not as sweet. We're all for throwing the little bundles of antioxidants into our cooking, but what's the best way?

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Several things we've read, including this thread on chowhound, suggest that they taste better after soaking at the bottom of a cup of tea, a traditional Chinese practice.

We think they'd be good in a rich chocolate cookie or brownie or tossed into homemade granola. You could also add them to a pot of Dried Fruit Warmed with Red Wine and Spices or a bowl of Steelcut Oats with Dates, Coconut, Cinnamon, and Pecans.

We've heard they go well in savory dishes — on top of pork, or even in a chicken soup (the chowhound thread mentions this, too).

As far as the juice, we think it tastes like a lighter, more pleasant prune juice, although our prune juice memories are foggy... We'd add it to a smoothie in a second, though.

Most goji berries are grown in China, although there is some debate about whether ones labeled Himalayan or Tibetan are better. We've read that some US farmers are starting to grow them, but for now, they likely fly on a plane to get to you.

You can find goji berries at health food stores, or buy them online:

Anyone out there eating and cooking with goji berries? How do you use them?

(Images: NutsOnline and Amazon)