Green Kitchens: Meshy HotSACKS Produce Bags

Here's a stylish way to carry your produce and use fewer plastic bags while you're at it. These reusable mesh bags from HotSACKS have a few distinct advantages over the cloth kind, along with a few potential disadvantages.

I really love that these bags are completely transparent, which is a major complaint about many cloth produce bags. This makes it easier for the check-out person to see what you’re buying and read PLU codes, and the same is true for us when we get back home.

Cleaning is also less of an issue with these mesh bags than with cloth bags. It looks like a simple rinse under warm water would get rid of any stickiness or grit from produce.

I also like that these bags are fairly understated. They're simple and aren’t emblazoned with any environmental slogans or images. They look similar enough to other kinds of packaging that they won’t raise eyebrows at the store. Some people love to be asked about their reusable bags and have a conversation about eco-friendly solutions, but honestly, that’s just not me.

On the downside, I really wonder how durable these bags are. The mesh seems like it could easily snag on other things in the basket and potentially tear. After all, the mesh bags that hold bulk onions and potatoes at the grocery store are meant to be torn apart with just your fingers. Even though the plastic they’re made from is recyclable, I don’t really want to be throwing them away any time soon.

I also wish that the bags had a draw-string closure or something else that would make it easier to keep the bag closed. This isn’t so much of an issue at the store as it is back in our fridge, like when I want to take one apple and leave the rest. Both the closure issue and the fact that the mesh is so loose also means that these bags won’t really work for bulk purchases like grains or nuts.

Meshy HotSACKS bags are made from polyethylene resin, a fully recyclable plastic, and are fairly inexpensive:

Meshy HotSACKS Produce Bag, $4.99 for a set of 8

Have any of you used these bags or those similar? What are your thoughts?

Related: No More Plastic Bags: Kootsac Food Storage Sacks

(Image: HotSACKS)