Do You Practice Acts of Guerilla Cooking?

Slate

What does the word cooking mean to you? Does it mean you need a sharp chef's knife? A good saucepan? Salts and seasonings and herbs? What if someone told you there are no rules, that cooking can happen anywhere, anytime?

Last week, Brian Palmer wrote a piece for Slate on "guerilla cooking," a form of cooking that is highly portable, creative and industrious. It involves you putting together interesting meals regardless of whether you're in your own kitchen or a cramped office space.

So how exactly would one put together an enticing lunch in an office space that boasts, at most, a random collection of plastic utensils? Palmer notes, "Just as you can sleep wherever you happen to be tired, you can cook anywhere so long as you have the essentials (food, heat)." He encourages you to stock up on basics like salt, pepper and olive oil and find a few essential, portable pieces of cooking equipment such as a hot plate and a hot water kettle. Then you're pretty much set. Stir-fries, soups, frittatas and quesadillas are now at your fingertips, and Palmer insists you should flex your creativity muscles beyond even that.

He is realistic, noting that guerilla cooking takes a certain amount of preparation and thought. For example, his favorite office couscous requires him to put a few bags together before work: one consists of the couscous and whatever herbs and spices he'd like and the other consists of the vegetables he'd like to add in, with a third optional bag of toasted nuts. Then, he insists that the on-site preparation is a breeze. Palmer cooks the vegetables and the couscous and, voila: "A fresh lunch in the privacy of your own office."

Read More: You Don't Need a Kitchen To Be a Chef at Slate
So we'd like to know: what acts of guerilla cooking have you practiced?

Related: Office Lunch Survival Kit: 6 Essentials to Keep at the Office

(Image: Faith Durand)