David Lebovitz Turns Popovers into Sugared Puffs

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The premise of the Recipe Redux column in The New York Times Magazine is that a chef tackles an old, dusty recipe from the newspaper's archives and creates something similar, but with more bells and whistles. It's a good premise, although we think that sometimes the 2.0 version is overly complicated—like when a sweet dish very similar to Sara Kate's Big Pancake came out the other end as Moroccan-spiced chicken dumplings. (We just wanted the pancake.) But in this week's column, David Lebovitz gave us a redux that kept all the charm of the original but elevated it to something sublime: the Sugared Puff.

We've given you a recipe for popovers in the past, and they are truly delightful. An eggy batter that balloons up in the oven, giving you a hot, crunchy crust that breaks open to a hollow middle with slightly soft, chewy walls. Delicious.

They're not sweet, although after reading Lebovitz's version, we think they should be always. Because how good does this sound? Popovers, perked up with a little sugar in the batter, that are baked in the same pan (a muffin pan works, too) and then brushed with melted butter and rolled in cinnamon sugar.

Lebovitz describes his sugared puffs as cinnamon doughnuts without all the frying and the heavy filling. The writer, Amanda Hesser, refers to them as "part soufflé, part doughnut, part cinnamon toast." We're calling them our next weekend brunch project.

Has anyone made them? Tell us how they went!

Read the full article and get the recipe:
Recipe Redux: Maida Heatter's Popovers, from The New York Times
David Lebovitz's Sugared Puffs

Related: Kitchen Tour: At Home in Paris with David Lebovitz

(Images: Tom Schierlitz for The New York Times)