Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen

Museum of Modern Art

Our kitchens say something about ourselves and the world we live in. “Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen,” a new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, presents a history of the last century as told by our kitchens, through everyday objects, short films and even a fully reconstructed German kitchen from the 1920s.

The exhibition is divided into three sections. “The New Kitchen” explores design before World War Two, as kitchens became more like laboratories, focused on efficiency and hygiene. The centerpiece is a complete Frankfurt Kitchen, one of 10,000 manufactured for public-housing complexes in Germany in the 1920s as part of a plan to modernize the city of Frankfurt.

“Visions of Plenty” looks at postwar kitchens, from the colorful materials and fully-automated appliances of the 1950s to the more environmentally conscious design of the 1970s. Through photographs, prints and films by artists like Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman, “Kitchen Sink Dramas” examines the kitchen as artistic subject, and how it has been used to address larger themes of politics, economics and gender.

“Counter Space” continues through March 14, 2011, so there’s plenty of time to find your way to New York to see this compelling exhibition. If you've already been, please let us know your thoughts!

For more information: Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen - MoMA.org

(Images: Museum of Modern Art, used by permission)

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