9-Bottle Bar Recipe: The Manhattan

Cocktail Recipes from The Kitchn

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The 9-Bottle Bar wouldn't be complete without the ingredients to whip up the Manhattan, one of the quintessential classic cocktails.

The sharp, full-bodied combination of aged American whiskey, sweet vermouth, and bitters was likely first minted sometime in the latter half of the 1800s. Its exact origins are unknown, but clearly the bartender who created the Manhattan was on to something, because this drink has truly stood the test of time.

As cocktails come, the Manhattan is pretty straightforward. Three ingredients—one spiritous, one sweet, one bitter—stirred with ice. But its simplicity is deceptive. There's a magic that happens when this trio plays together. The range of flavors present run from caramel to dark fruit to cloves to vanilla.

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Some versions of the recipe for the Manhattan call for bourbon whiskey, some suggest Canadian. The 9-Bottle Bar version calls for rye, which was very likely used by the bartenders who made it first. The spiciness of the rye gives the drink a beautiful structure and finish. It's a drink you'll want to linger over, to savor.

Manhattan

Serves 1

2 ounces bonded straight rye whiskey, such as Rittenhouse
1 ounce Dolin Rouge sweet vermouth
3 dashes Angostura bitters

Add ingredients to a mixing glass. Fill the glass with ice cubes and stir for about 30 seconds. Strain contents into a chilled cocktail glass.

Recipe Notes

  • Optionally, garnish a Manhattan with a cocktail cherry or a swath of orange peel.

Per serving, based on 1 servings. (% daily value)
Calories
172
Carbs
0.8 g (0.3%)
Sugars
0.3 g
Protein
0 g (0%)
Sodium
1.4 mg (0.1%)

(Image credits: Roger Kamholz)

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Categories

Main, Drinks, Cocktail, Recipe, The 9-Bottle Bar

Roger is the Cocktail & Liquor Columnist at The Kitchn. He's a widely published writer and photographer whose work has been featured on Serious Eats, PUNCH, and Food & Wine online. He lives in New York City with his wife, Karen.

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