5 Things We Can Learn from This Victorian Kitchen

5 Things We Can Learn from This Victorian Kitchen

(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)

When I first came across this kitchen, I couldn't stop scrolling through the photos. I was immediately captivated by the kitchen's openness and how polished yet still welcoming it seems.

The kitchen was recently expanded by combining the existing kitchen and a rarely used screened-in porch. The more I looked at the finished kitchen from Jessica Helgerson Interior Design, the more smart ideas I found. Here are the five lessons you can learn from this remodeled space.

(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)

1. Create a statement-making focal point.

The heart of this kitchen is the range that is built into the hearth-like structure in center of the space. By creating the structure surrounding the range, your eye immediately rests here as the most important part of the kitchen. Plus, the walls of the hearth are the opposite of the walls in the rest of the kitchen — it's a great mirrored design that shows up elsewhere in the kitchen as well.

(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)

2. It's okay to flip-flop colors.

The cabinets and counters are all done in a gray-and-white color scheme, but look at the kitchen island versus the built-in cabinets — they are exactly the opposite. While this is a detail that doesn't leap out at you unless you're looking for it, it creates a nice sense of balance in the kitchen, and prevents it from feeling too stark with all-white cabinetry and walls.

(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)

3. Don't be afraid to add comfortable furniture.

With a kitchen of this size, you'll have plenty of space to fill, and adding a sofa or upholstered chair can make the space even more appealing. I can imagine spending Sunday mornings on this sofa with a cup of coffee and my book or list of saved articles to read. Plus, it's ideal when you're entertaining and want guests to relax while you're putting the finishing touches on the meal.

(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)

4. Tile everything.

I know there are conflicting views about subway tile among our readers, but I love the way they used it in this kitchen. Instead of just tiling the backsplash or the wall above the range, they went all in, tiling the walls from top to bottom. I love this execution and think it works perfectly for the space.

(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)
(Image credit: Lincoln Barbour)

5. Coordinate the details.

While you don't want your kitchen to be too matching, you do want coordinating elements to tie everything together. The brass pot racks, hanging light fixture, and drawer knobs and pulls do just that. Sticking with one type of metal — even in slightly different finishes — makes every choice feel deliberate.

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