4 Solutions to Help Organize Every Junk Drawer In America

Organizing Tips from The Kitchn

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Every home has them, and for the most part, they could all use a little chaos control. We're talking about junk drawers. Although they aren't especially tricky to organize, they seem mentally overwhelming since little stuff can be taxing!

Need help? Here are four solutions for every jumbled junk drawer in America!

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1. Arrange (perfectly!) with modular drawer organizers.

If you want truly custom solutions to fit every last pair of scissors and roll of kitchen twine, these pieces can be custom-fit to contain the specifics of your drawer within the limitations of your space. If you adore your "junk" drawer but want it to be a thing of beauty instead of an eyesore, go for it. We applaud you.

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2. Organize (cheaply) with ice cube trays.

For a cheaper but still very useful solution, create little pockets of anti-chaos in your drawer with ice cube trays. These are about $1 and let's face it, they're handy. Even awkward longer items are still defined and there's no expensive trip to The Container Store involved.

3. Remember: You'll use it if you see it.

Our junk drawers are part actual junk and part everyday items that don't really have a place. Scissors, calculators, that magnet with the good pizza place on it — you know, stuff like that. This video reminds us that if you don't use it often, it can go somewhere else and if you can't see it, you'll never use it!

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4. Never be afraid to get rid of it entirely.

A few years back I moved to Chicago with a knapsack and some snacks. I got rid of my junk drawer and haven't brought it back since. Bills and mail get sorted at the door; batteries and stamps live on my desk; important memos get photographed and stored in my phone or in the cloud. It sounds radical, but it can be done! Plus it will free up a drawer for your ridiculously adorable napkin rings and towels that aren't for everyday use. Perfecto!

(Image credits: Flickr member zeelicious licensed for use by Creative Commons; Ditte Isager for Martha Stewart; Kimberly Luther; Martha Stewart)